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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: pomegranates

Promenade in the Pomegranates

What a match--honey bees and pomegranate blossoms.

Watching the golden bees forage amid the brilliant red blossoms in the late afternoon is a delight to see, especially when the sun backlights them. 

The ancient fruit, native to Iran, is one of the world's first cultivated fruits. Thankfully, it is now "trendy" in California, with some 30,000 acres of pomegranates in production. We treasure its ruby-red kernels, tart flavor, and high antioxidant content. Since ancient times, the fruit has symbolized health and fertility. It's been said that Adam and Eve weren't tempted by an apple in the Garden of Eden, but by a pomegranate. In Egypt, the pomegranate was known as "The Fruit of Kings." 

Spanish settlers introduced the pomegranate tree to California in 1769. The honey bees came later: 1853. 

But when you think about it, honey bees and pomegranates have been together for millions of years--just not in California.  

The pomegranate tree in our yard is 86 years old and has seen generations of bees come and go. 

A promenade in the pomegranates...

A backlit honey bee heads for a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A backlit honey bee heads for a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A backlit honey bee heads for a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Caught in flight, a honey bee makes a beeline to a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Caught in flight, a honey bee makes a beeline to a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Caught in flight, a honey bee makes a beeline to a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar of the gods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The nectar of the gods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar of the gods. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 10:20 PM
Tags: honey bees (4), pomegranates (4)

Bee-ing Thankful

President Obama just pardoned a couple of turkeys--Apple and Cider. They won't make it to the White House Thanksgiving dinner today.

But what he could have done--when he was pardoning the turkeys--was to praise the honey bees.

Without honey bees,  Thanksgiving Day dinner--as we know it--would not exist.

It's time to "bee" thankful.

If your table includes pumpkin, cranberries, carrots, cucumbers, onions, apples, oranges, cherries, blueberries, grapefruit, persimmons, pomegranates, pears, sunflower seeds, and almonds, thank the bees for their pollination services.

Spices? Thank the bees, too. Bees visit the plants that eventually comprise our spices, including sage, basil, oregano and thyme. 

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology faculty, says that even milk and ice cream are linked closely to the honey bee. Cows feed on alfalfa, which is pollinated by honey bees (along with other bees).

So, pardon the turkeys? Well, at least "Apple" and "Cider." But let's praise the honey bees, too.

And pomegranates!

Bee on Pomegranate Blossom
Bee on Pomegranate Blossom

HONEY BEE foraging on pomegranate blossom. Without bees, there would be no pomegranates. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of the pomegranate kernels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 25, 2010 at 7:32 AM

A Beeline for the Pomegranates

“You’re not going to be able to jump on the pomegranate bandwagon with your pockets bulging with gold without a lot of hard work,”  Kevin Day, farm advisor with UC Cooperative Extension Tulare County, told a reporter for a news story published May 14 in the Western Farm Press.

Yes, hard work.

Day  told Western Farm Press that from 2006 to 2009, the number of acres in California planted with pomegranate trees "has increased from 12,000 or 15,000 acres in 2006, to 29,000 acres in 2009."

“We’ve doubled in three years, and that’s a lot of young pomegranate trees,” he said.

And that's a lot of work for the honey bees, too.

Our "orchard" of one pomegranate tree is buzzing with bees.

Just when we thought they'd forgotten their old buddy--"old" because the pomegranate tree was planted in 1927--here they come in the late afternoon. One by one, two by two, they head for the blossoms to gather the nectar and roll in the pollen of the papery blossoms.

Gold may bulge from the pockets of pomegranate orchardists, but a different kind of gold bulges from the honey bees--pollen.

Get in Line
Get in Line

A honey bee works a pomegranate blossom, while another bee moves in right behind her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Double Duty
Double Duty

TWO HONEY BEES work a pomegranate blossom on an 82-year-old tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 at 12:42 PM

Getting the Red In

If you love pomegranates, you can thank a honey bee.

If you love capturing images of pomegranates, you can thank a honey bee.

And, if you love juicing them and making pomegranate jelly—as I do—you can thank a honey bee.

The honey bee makes it all possible.

In mid-May, our 81-year old pomegranate tree blossomed. The silky red blossoms drew dozens of bees. On May 26, armed with a macro lens, I photographed them gathering nectar and pollen.

The blossoms, like the bees, quickly vanished. Worker bees live only four to six weeks during the busy season. The blossoms dropped and fruit formed. Today, four months later, the harvest-ready fruit glistens with red jewels. More photo ops!

The tree is truly amazing. It’s 81 years old and yields six to seven orchard boxes of fruit each year. How can we be certain of its age? It was planted in 1927, the same year our Spanish stucco home was built. The owners planted a pomegranate tree because “our daughter loved them.”

So do the bees.

Bee pollinating a pomegranate
Bee pollinating a pomegranate

A honey bee pollinates a pomegranate blossom on May 26, 2008. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Split personality
Split personality

Four months after the pomegranate tree blossomed, this is the result: crimson jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 26, 2008 at 6:04 PM
Tags: honey bees (4), pollination (1), pomegranates (4)
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